The Science of Healthy Buildings

Healthy buildings are buildings that prioritize the quality of indoor environments. They bring together data science, machine learning, and best-in-class technology to facilitate connectivity and visibility. These buildings address key criteria, such as air quality and ventilation, to optimize indoor shared spaces.

Did you know humans spend 90% of their lives indoors?

Indoor environments are humans’ natural habitats. We spend 90% of our life indoors,
breathing mostly indoor air up to 20,000 times a day. What are we doing to make our
natural habitats - indoor environments - healthier shared spaces?

There are invisible risks present in indoor environments

In order to protect indoor spaces from harmful microorganisms, it's critical to address all vectors of transmission: air, surfaces, and person-to-person contact. A key mitigation strategy is to implement the CDC's guidelines regarding layered strateagies and hierarchies of controls. A multi-layered approach to environmental safety ensures that indoor environments are safer for occupants and avoids dependence on human behavior alone. As a sustainable, effective disinfection solution, UV-C can play a key role in a layered strategy for achieving indoor environmental quality.

Company meeting
Air
Air
Upper-room UVGI creates a zone of irradiation in occupied spaces to disinfect air safely above the heads of room occupants.

Person-to-
Person
Contact
Person-to-Person Contact
UV-C disinfection is safe for human exposure and can be used in rooms with people present to deactivate microorganisms.

Surfaces
Surfaces
UV-C is an effective disinfectant strategy for high-touch surfaces in crowded spaces.

How UV-C works

Ultraviolet (UV) light is light with a wavelength between 10 and 400 nanometers (nm). This light is not visible to the human eye. UV light has three sub-types: UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C.

Light Spectre
Without UV-C or UVGI, the DNA can reproduce without interruption. Normal DNA
UV-C light passes through, causing modifications to the genetic material, called dimers. DNA under UV-C
Feline Calicivirus

Feline Calicivirus

MRSA

MRSA

Escherichiia Colii

Escherichiia Colii

Human Coronavirus

Human Coronavirus

What is UV-C?
How is UV-C deadly to organisms?
What organisms can UV-C inactivate?

Of the three types of UV light, UV-C has the shortest wavelength (100 or 200 - 280 nm). Consequently, UV-C light cannot pass through Earth’s atmosphere. As a result, it is germicidal or deadly to organisms on Earth because they have not been naturally exposed to it.

UV-C light inactivates microorganisms by penetrating their cell walls and disrupting the replication of their genetic material. This disruption causes molecular lesions or dimers to form in their DNA. These dimers or lesions are covalent linkages between consecutive bases along a DNA strand rather than across a strand, and their presence prevents replication.

UV-C can inactivate harmful microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, mold, and mildew.

UV-C as a general disinfection method is recommended by
the world’s leading health organizations

Ready to get started making your space safer
with better indoor air quality?

Arc

Arc

254nm UV-C for air and surface disinfection in unoccupied spaces

Beam

Beam

265nm upper room UVGI for autonomous, continuous air disinfection in occupied spaces

Vive

Vive

222nm far UV for autonomous, continuous air and surface disinfection in occupied spaces

Learn more about our science-backed solutions.